Fly Fishing for Carp, Backstabber Carp Flies, Carp Fly Line, Sandy River Spey Clave Agenda, Jerry Siem, Trevor Covich

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Fly Fishing For Carp

B.H. Bugger, Black

B.H. Bugger, Brown

B.H. Bugger, Olive

Red Head Leech
EP Spawning Shrimp, Root Beer
EP Spawning Shrimp, RB

B.H. Mini Leech, Black

B.H. Mini Leech, Olive

B.H. Mini Leech, Wine

Backstabber, Olive

Backstabber, Wine
Carp Defined
By: Mark Bachmann
Carp are only recently regarded as sport fish in the fly fishing community. To most anglers they are not beautiful. Common Carp are close cousins to an indigenous specie in the Columbia Basin and most streams in the Pacific Northwest, the Course Scale Sucker, which is not held in very high regard by many fly fishers.
Yet, Carp are one of the most recently evolved family of fishes. Carp are held in high regard for their ability to adapt, and learn. They will test your skills.
The family Cyprinidae, from the Ancient Greek kyprînos (κυπρῖνος, "carp"), consists of the carps, the true minnows, and their relatives (for example, the Barbs, Barbels, Pacific Northwest Suckers, Chub, Shiners & Dace). Commonly called the carp family or the minnow family, its members are also known as cyprinids. It is the largest family of fresh-water fish, with over 2,400 species in about 220 genera. The family belongs to the order Cypriniformes, of whose genera and species the cyprinids make up two-thirds.

The common carp is a fish native to Eurasia which has been introduced to nearly every part of the world. The original common carp is thought to have originated from the delta of the Danube River. In that region it was domesticated at least 2,000 years ago.  Although this fish was initially kept as an exploited captive, it was later maintained in large, specially built ponds by the Romans in south-central Europe (verified by the discovery of common carp remains in excavated settlements in the Danube delta area). As aquaculture became a profitable branch of agriculture, efforts were made to farm these fish, and the culture systems soon included spawning and growing ponds.

The common carp's native range also extends to the Black Sea, Caspian Sea and Aral Sea. Both European and Asian subspecies have been domesticated. In Europe, domestication of carp as food fish was spread by Christian monks between the 13th and 16th centuries. The wild forms of carp had reached the delta of the Rhine in the twelfth century already, probably with some human help. Variants that have arisen with domestication include the mirror carp, with large mirror-like scales (linear mirror – scaleless except for a row of large scales that run along the lateral line; originating in Germany), the leather carp (virtually unscaled except near dorsal fin), and the fully scaled carp. Koi carp (錦鯉 (nishikigoi) in Japanese, 鯉魚 (pinyin: lĭ yú) in Chinese) is a domesticated ornamental variety that originated in the Niigata region of Japan in the 1820s. They also invaded the Great Lakes in 1896 when the area near Newmarket flooded and allowed them to escape into the Holland River. The history of carp farming is rampant with escapement. In most places in North America carp are considered an invasive specie. There is no management strategy in Oregon except occasionally, eradication. There are no imposed seasons or limits, yet populations are rampant.

Although they are very tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. A schooling fish, they prefer to be in groups of 5 or more. They naturally live in a temperate climate in fresh or slightly brackish water with a pH of 6.5–9.0 and salinity up to about 5‰, and temperatures of 3 - 35 °C, (37°F - 95°F). The ideal temperature is 23 - 30 °C, (73°F - 86°F), with spawning beginning at 17–18 °C; they will readily survive winter in a frozen over pond, as long as some free water remains below the ice. Carp are able to tolerate water with very low oxygen levels, by gulping air at the surface.
Common carp are omnivorous. They can eat a vegetarian diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton),crawfish, and benthic worms.
IGFA All Tackle Record Common Carp: 75 lb. 11 oz., Leo van der Gugten, Lac de St. Cassien, France, 05/21/1987
Fly Rod World Record Common Carp:  42 lb., Paolo Pacchiarini, Annone Lake, Italy, 03/04/2002
Sources of data: Paradoxoff Planet, Wikipedia, IGFA
Backstabber Carp Flies By Jay Zimmerman
Jay Zimmerman has been tying flies and chasing carp since he was a child. Jay grew up in a log cabin in Ohio, learned to hunt squirrels from his mother and learned archery, marksmanship, and how to fly fish from his father. Jay worked as an archaeologist for the Toledo University Anthropology Department before graduating from high school and becoming an infantry paratrooper in the elite 82nd Airborne Division. After being honorably discharged from the Army, Jay worked as a commercial halibut fisherman out of Kodiak Island, Alaska. He later worked as a moose-hunting guide out of Galena, Alaska, and as a bear-hunting guide in Ontario, Canada. Jay worked construction for a time, both as a carpenter and with concrete before he fled to Colorado and the fly-fishing industry and has guided, taught casting, and fly tying classes, managed fly shops and is now a commercial fly designer for Umpqua Feather Merchants and is currently employed by Charlie Craven at Charlie’s Fly Box in Arvada, Colorado. We are pleased to offer two of his most productive carp flies.
Backstabber, Olive
The Backstabber series, so named because the flies ride with the hook pointed up along the back of the fly, is meant to land softly and sink quickly to the bottom where carp do most of their feeding.

Item Description Size Price To Top
17500 Backstabber Fly, Olive 6 3 for $14.85
Backstabber, Wine
This dark red variation of the Backstabber is both visible and unobtrusive at the same time.

Item Description Size Price To Top
17504 Backstabber Fly, Wine 6 3 for $14.85
RIO Carp Fly Line

Combines a medium length head with a smooth front taper for a subtle presentation. Wary carp will not be spooked by either the presentation or the camo olive color of the line.
This may also be the ultimate line for New Zealand where trout are noted to be ultra spooky, and anglers often dye their lines olive color.
Having the perfect fly line for the situation provides an immense tactical advantage for any angler. The RIO Carp Line is the right line for spooky, cold water fishes in a variety of situations. Don't pass on this line for fishing spooky, back-eddy sippers when trout fishing.
Carp Line
Item Description Size Price To Top
20880 RIO CarpLine, Camo Olive Color WF5F $74.95
20881 RIO CarpLine, Camo Olive Color WF6F $74.95
20882 RIO CarpLine, Camo Olive Color WF7F $74.95
20883 RIO CarpLine, Camo Olive Color WF8F $74.95
 
Jerry Siem To Present At The Sandy River Spey Clave, Saturday, May 16, 10:00-10:30am
By way of biographic perspective, I tied my first fly when I was nine and have fly fished ever since.  I guided on the Henry's Fork in the early 70's where I met a fleet of great angling legends with the names of Joe Brooks, Lee Wulff among them.  During my guiding days, the rods were fiberglass or cane and I had a chance to cast some of the first fly rods ever made from graphite.  Tom Morgan and Glenn Brackett brought Winston to Montana from San Francisco,  and having guided with Glenn the opportunity allowed me to join them in Twin Bridges in the early 80's.  Following the rise of the sport of fly fishing with the success A River Runs Through It, further opportunity to pursue fly rod design at Sage became available and in 1992 I moved to the Hood Canal area of Washington state.  In March of this year (2015) I enter my 23rd year in the capacity as Fly Rod Designer.  I think we are building some very interesting fly rod designs now, and I look forward to presenting tips on fly rod handling to your guests and in helping them better understand how to get the most out of todays gear.
Video Featuring: Jerry Siem

Sage Method Rod from Far Bank on Vimeo.

Jerry's Best Work (in my opinion)
Integral to Jerry Siem's success as Sage's Head Rod Designer is his ability to produce rods that just "feel-good" to a wide range of fly casters. Jerry places connectedness with the angler as a high priority in every rod design. The more an angler can feel, the better he will cast and otherwise perform on the water. This ability to "feel" though each rod has become easier to attain with every new development in graphite material technology. This is by far most noticeable with Konnetic Technology, Sage' secret weapon, enabling them to build the most accurate casting rods available. You can just feel more through the rod with Konnetic Technology. Nowhere is this more apparent than with two-hand fly rods where feeling the rod load with the weight of the line is ultra important in making the best casts. And nowhere is this more noticeable than with Sage's 7136-4 ONE, which is the steelhead rod I always return to when the chips are down. Thanks Jerry, for enabling me to feel better while I'm fishing. MB
All my closest fishing buddies, and best steelhead fishing clients own a Sage 7136-4 ONE rod, and although most of them have experimented with a wide range of rods, the 7136-4 ONE is the one we all take with us on every trip, summer or winter, PNW, B.C. or Kamchatka. This rod casts every kind of fly line and will deal with every size of steelhead. True, you might also take a rod that is smaller and one that is heavier, but you will always want this one with you. MB

(Got the great picture above from Russ Miller) with this caption:
Overnight float with Paul Richardson and Brandon Morris. 
Day 1 in the heat of the day, second rod through the head and it was my second pass through the head.  Switched to a smaller pink and polar bear fly with some JC eyes and lead dumbbells.  10 casts in, pow.  The beast jumped 3 times clearing a couple feet with each jump!  My heart stopped with each leap, I tried to hold ground, but he ended up taking me into the next pool before Richardson had to use two hands to tail the thing.  We were all electric!  That afternoon, I celebrated that fish with some fine whisky and was barely able to row the boat!
Set up:
7136-4 ONE (I built this rod when I started on the factory floor, cut, rolled, wrapped.  Last year I put “boom stick” on the blank.  It is living up to its name. 
EVOKE 10 RH
iFlight 525 w/ConnectCore line
Type 6 15ft tip
16lb steelhead tippet
Cool hand tied fly
 
Miss Piggy Turns Eight
In 2007 I bought an 18' custom pontoon boat from Outcast, which is a division of Aire. The pontoons are the same as the Aire Lion model. This boat was built using an aluminum frame made from NRS components. Since then this boat has made an average of 53 trips per season on the Sandy River in search of winter steelhead and Chinook. In other words it has made 373 trips hauling me and clients. the rest of the time it has been stored in the open in my back yard (under a tarp during the summer & completely exposed to the elements during the winter). There have been few modifications (a wooden floor) and minimal maintenance (replace some of the nylon straps). The rest of the boat is as purchased. Minimal air has been added or lost. I wish that everything else I had ever bought had been this economical and trouble free to maintain.
When it comes to inflatable boats Made In USA by Outcast is a very good way to go. These boats might be a little more expensive in the beginning, but are hassle free for years.
How did my boat get her name? Well I loaned it to a friend of mine to help him teach a Spey School for me. Happened to be that our local rivers were very low-water at the time, and my friend is a great Spey caster but apparently not as experienced at rowing boats on technical water. He had a lot of trouble getting this large boat to fit between the exposed rocks. Upon returning from the river, after his ordeal he eyed my arms with new respect and asked, "How do you row that tank?
You ought to call her Miss Piggy." My only reply was, "I do". So now with a high degree of respect and affection, that is her name. Miss Piggy is tough and reliable, as are all of the Outcast Boats. Patty and I also own a pair of PAC 9000's, which are in my estimation the best lake and stream boats ever made for shallow draft and maneuverability. If you are in the market for an inflatable boat, consider Outcast as the best boats made anywhere in this world.

PAC 800

PAC 900

PAC 9000

PAC 1000

PAC 1200
 

Sandy River Spey Clave 2015 Agenda for on the Water Presentations

This File Is Under Construction And Will Change - Check Back Often - Last Up-Dated: 03/24/15
This year marks the 15th Sandy River 'Clave. To our knowledge, The Sandy River Spey Clave is the largest gathering of Spey Casters in the Western Hemisphere. All of the best Spey Tackle manufacturers are there. The top Spey Casters in the Pacific Northwest will give On-The-Water Presentations and will act as your personal instructors during Friday's FREE Beginner's Class.
The Sandy River Spey Clave is totally integrated. Male and female Instructors/Presenters will be mixed into all three days of the scheduled on-the-water programs.
Free Catered Food has been added for lunch all three days. We are all members of the “Spey Community.” The essence of the Sandy River Spey 'Clave is as much social as it is educational. See you there, friends.
Sandy River Spey Clave Program Agenda 2015 Sandy River Spey Clave Theater Agenda 2015

Mark Bachmann

Al Buhr
George Cook  is a factory representative for Sage, Simms, RIO, Tibor, Action Optics, Solitude
George Cook

Trevor Covich

Klaus Frimor

Simon Gawesworth

Whitney Gould

Hawkeye Hawkins
Jon Hazlett
Jon Hazlett

Jeff Hickman

Scott Howell

Travis Johnson

Tom Larimer

Dax Messett

Mike McCune


Steve Rajeff

Nick Rowell
Nick Rowell
Marty Sheppard
Marty Sheppard
Mia Sheppard
Mia Sheppard

Jerry Siem


Zack Williams

Mariusz Wroblewski

Rich Zellman
 
Friday, May 15 Saturday, May 16 Sunday, May 17
9:00-9:30 am
Mia Sheppard
"Transition from single hand to double hand casting"
9:00-9:30 am
Steve Rajeff
"3 Dominant Spey Casts"
9:00-9:30 am
John Hazlett
"The Triangle Offense Of Spey"
9:30-10:00 am
Al Buhr
"Teach yourself to fix common casting faults"
9:30-10:00 am
George Cook
"North West Favorite "

9:30-10:00 am
Dax Messett
"Zen And The Art Of Being Mega"

10:00-10:30 am
Mariusz Wroblewski

"Echo Glass Rods"

10:00-10:30 am
Jerry Siem
Everything you want to know about your rod.
10:00-10:30 am
Brian Styskal
10:30-11:00 am
Zack Williams-"Fishing Clean"
10:30-11:00 am
Travis Johnson
"The Reality Of The Situation"
10:30-11:00 am
Simon Gawesworth
11:00-11:30 am
HawkEye-
"Drills to improve your casting skills"

11:00-11:30 am
Jeff Hickman
11:00-11:30 am
Rich Zellman
"Simple Solutions To Common Problems"

11:30-12:00 am
Mark Bachmann

Fly Speed & Presentation

11:30-12:00 am
Scott Howell
11:30-12:00 am
Tom Larimer
12:00-1:00
FREE Lunch
Prepared & served by:
 El Burro Loco
12:00-1:00
FREE Lunch
Prepared & served by:
 El Burro Loco
12:00-1:00
FREE Lunch
Prepared & served by:
 El Burro Loco
1:00 - 4:00 pm
Free Casting Day This is the largest FREE Spey Casting School offered anywhere...period!!!We're talking about 24 instructors, and 120 students, in 2-miles of river
3-HOURS STRAIGHT !!!
FOR FREE !!!
Please Sign Up Here:
speyclave2015@ragingriversales.com

The first 100-students are guaranteed hands-on instruction by a professional instructor.
All 23 instructors
are named on this Agenda Page.
1:00-1:30 pm
Whitney Gould"
Proper Fly Speed For Steelhead On The Swing"
1:00-1:30 pm

1:30-2:00 pm
Mike McCune
Trout spey
1:30-2:00 pm

2:00-2:30 pm
Nick Rowell
2:00-4:00 pm
Try out tackle.
2:30-3:00 pm
Marty Sheppard
"Parameters Of Grain Windows
3:00-3:30 pm
Klaus Frimor-
"Scandi Casting And The Art Of Anchor Placement"
3:30-4:00 pm
Jerry French & Trevor Covich
"OPST Pure Skagit Lines"
 

Sandy River Spey Clave Theater Agenda 2014

May 16 May 17 May 18

9:00am- 10:00am
 Tying Flies with Charles St.Pierre

9:00am- 10:00am
Local Patterns with Brian Silvey
9:00am- 10:00am
Local Patterns with Brian Silvey
10:00am- 11:00am
"Tying Tube Flies" Bruce Berry

10:00am- 11:00am
“Tying Chinook Flies” with Trevor Covich

10:00am- 11:00am
“Flies For The O.P.” Jerry French

11:00am- 12:00am
"Modern Flies for the Northwest" Tevor Covich

11:00am- 12:00am
”Understanding and getting the most of your MOW’S”
With George Cook 

11:00am- 12:00am
"Tying Tube Flies" Bruce Berry
 Lunch NOON-1:00
Lunch NOON-1:00
Lunch NOON-1:00

1:00pm- 2:00pm
"Free Casting School - No Program"

1:00pm- 2:00pm "Flies For the O.P." Jerry French

1:00pm- 2:00pm
 Tying Flies with Charles St.Pierre

2:00pm- 3:00pm "Free Casting School - No Program" 2:00pm- 3:00pm "Tying Tube Flies" Bruce Berry

2:00pm- 3:00pm
“Modern Flies for the Northwest”
Trevor Covich

3:00pm- 4:00pm  "Free Casting School - No Program"

3:00pm- 4:00pm
 Tying Flies with Charles St.Pierre

3:00pm- 4:00pm Anounce Raffle Winners
Dinner and Movie Dinner and Movie Clave Over See You Next Year.
Trevor Covich To Present at The Sandy River Spey Clave, Friday May 16. 3:30-4:00 PM
Trevor Covich is a native Washingtonian and has been fly fishing since he was 4yrs old and while growing up he found a passion for trout, salmon and steelhead. Professionally he has been guiding fly anglers for the last decade on the Kanektok River for Alaska West, 4 seasons in Southern Chile, and hosted 2 seasons in the Bahamas. His true passion is tying and swinging flies for Chinook and steelhead either in Alaska, BC or on the Olympic Peninsula. He guides and teaches Skagit style Spey casting for OPST, Olympic Peninsula Skagit Tactics. He is a river steward and an advocate of catch and release of ALL wild steelhead…this is his passion, what he loves and wishes to share with people who seek a true Northwest experience.

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