Korkers KGB Boots, Skagit Lines and Sinking Tips

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FISH LONG & PROSPER !!!
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Fly Tying Party
Korkers KGB Boots
Skagit Lines
FREE FLY BOX WITH $50 FLY PURCHASE !!! 

January 6, 2013
FLY TYING PARTY
The Fly Fishing Shop, Welches, OR
11
:00 am to 4:00 pm Sunday Afternoon.
Pro Micro Tube Fly

Tying Steelhead Flies With Pro Tube's Revolutinary Systems
Featuring Free Tying Instruction From:
Pro Tube Systems Rep: Bruce Berry
Assisted by: Mark Bachmann and Travis Johnson.

This program is for new tiers and experienced tiers alike.
Instructional demonstrations with big-screen TV and PowerPoint projection.
A custom made fly tying room with perfect lighting
and special teaching aides are provided.
Please bring your own tools & materials or purchase what you need from our extensive selection.
Refreshments will be served. Bring snacks if you want to.

Korkers KGB Wading Shoes 5

The Korkers KGB (Korkers Guide Boot) is a product that has evolved from close contact with, and advise from many professional fishing guides. These boots incorporate the comfort and technical functionality you have come to expect only from Korkers foot wear, such as super-lightweight construction combined with changeable outer soles allowing perfect adaptability to any terrain. The bomber lacing system has a locking feature for improved fit for all foot types. Construction features: durable rubber, mesh and laces along with a TPU cage and Vibram Idro Grip outsoles, significantly raising the performance of these top level wading boots. These boots are built to last through all the daily abuse that guides and hardcore fishers will subject them to.


Korkers KGB Wading Shoes
Click For larger image...

Comes with both Felt and Kling-On Soles

Video of KGB Boot in action.
A size 11 boot
weighs 2-pounds 6-ounces.
  • OmniTrax 3.0 Interchangeable Sole System adapts your traction to meet the performance needs of each River system
  • Extremely durable lacing system and laces
  • 100% Hydrophobic and waterproof materials
  • Durability - 50-75% stronger than standard woven fabric
  • Lightweight TPU cage to support ankles in uneven terrain
  • Reduction of stitched seams improves durability and eliminates potential failure points
  • 3D molded heel cap
  • Integrated midsole drainage ports allow water to drain quickly keeping boots lighter
  • True Fit sizing
  • Item Description Size Price To Top
    FB3615-08 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 8 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-09 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 9 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-10 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 10 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-11 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 11 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-12 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 12 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-13 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 13 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-14 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 14 $209.99 Sale Ended
    FB3615-15 Korkers KGB Wading Shoes, with Felt and Studded Kling-On Soles 15 $209.99 Sale Ended


    A Comprehensive Review Of Skagit Lines
    By: Mark Bachmann
    Skagit Shooting Head Lines are used primarily in the Pacific Northwest of North America for fishing steelhead and salmon. Some of the highest concentrations of fish occur during periods when water flows are highest and the water is very cold. Many of these fish will strike a fly only if it is in close proximity, so Skagit lines are made to take flies deep, and fish them slow. Skagit lines normally involve some kind of sinking tip sections to take flies down to depth quickly. These tips are designed to retain enough energy to turn over enormous flies. Anglers fishing the Skagit River in northern Washington State get credit for the evolution of these lines. Relative Working Depths For Skagit Shooting Heads
    Airflo RIO Royal Wulff Scientific Anglers
    Skagit Compact, Floating Skagit Flight, Floating Ambush, Floating Skagit Extreme, Floating
    Skagit Compact, Intermediate Skagit Flight, Intermediate   Skagit Extreme, Intermediate
    Skagit Switch Skagit Short   Skagit Extreme, Integrated
    Click for larger picture...
    It had snowed during the night higher in the watershed. Then the sky had cleared. The temperature had dropped. The river was running about 36-degrees. My client had already landed a large steelhead first thing in the morning. The water that held the fish was comparatively shallow and full of large boulders. He was fishing a M.O.W. Tip with 7.5' of T-11 on his floating 540-grain Airflo Floating Skagit Compact shooting head. His fly was probably fishing around 2' deep...perfect for where he had hooked the fish. He had continued to fish through the rest of the run with no more success and we had moved.
    Now the boat was anchored at the head of a long run that averaged 3' - 8' deep. This client had fished this same run with me many times before. Instead of changing tips, he decided to concentrate 3' - 4' deep water that extended about a third of the way out into the river...not a bad plan considering we were in water that no one else had fished that day. For a while I watched from the boat, then decided to follow through the pool fishing the outer two thirds of the run.
    Simon Gawesworth had sent me several of the new RIO iFlight heads to try out, and I selected one and fitted a 10' T-14 M.O.W. tip to it, then attached a 4' leader and a lightly weighted fly. This outfit had the right configuration to get the fly deep and work it slowly across the river in what I figured would be the most productive holding water. A hard strike came after ten minutes of moving and fishing down the river. The fish was lost, then several casts later another fish took the fly, and was also lost. But, adapting the tackle to the water had given me two chances.
    Water is 800 times denser than air. Air molecules create less friction than water molecules traveling at the same speed. In any river, most of the current speed is near the surface of the water because air molecules create less friction on water molecules than water molecules do against each other. The deeper the water, the heavier it gets, which creates even more friction. The deeper the water, the slower it moves. The bottom of most rivers is like a giant piece of sandpaper, which creates even more friction. Fly lines sink faster in slower water, so the deeper they go, the faster they sink.
    Floating fly lines float because they are constructed from materials that are lighter in weight (less dense) than water. Sinking fly lines sink because they are heavier (more dense) than water. In the past Skagit Shooting Heads were made entirely from floating material. Now some Skagit heads are made from slow sinking materials or from a combination of floating and sinking materials.
    The Skagit iFlight is a new generation of shooting head, mostly constructed from slow sinking clear material with only the rear portion of the head made from floating material.
    Scientific Anglers were first on the market with a sinking Skagit head. Their Skagit Extreme Intermediate Head is made entirely from blue colored translucent slow sinking  material. Airflo was soon to follow with their Skagit Compact Intermediate having the rear part of the line made from floating material. This allowed the angler to steer the rear part of the line for control.
    Since the Scientific Anglers Skagit Extreme head incorporates no floating material, it will sink somewhat deeper than the Airflo version. Because the entire head of the Extreme is underwater it also comes across the river with a slower swing. It is very stealthy, but is hard to visually track because it is all dark colored and is all underwater.
    Any line that is hard to see is harder to cast, and to control after the cast is made. RIO's iFlight incorporates a floating rear portion that is light orange for better visibility to the angler.
    Will Intermediate Skagit Heads ever replace floating ones for all around use? I think probably not, but they do have some specialized uses, especially when coupled with RIO's new iMOW tips (more on them later). Intermediate Skagit Heads do offer advantages when fishing deep and slow. They also have advantages when needing to cast long distances. Somehow the higher density construction material makes for longer flight time.
    Skagit heads are fatter and shorter than they were ten years ago. They also have more taper on each end, which makes them cast smoother and stay in the loop longer for longer flight time. On the average, Skagit Lines made today are much easier to use than those made in the past.
    Making Sense Out Of Sinking Tips
    Nothing else in the sport of fly fishing seems to create as much confusion as Skagit Lines and the Sinking Tips used with them.
    M.O.W. Tips Rolling Your Own Airflo Custom Cut Tips
    iM.O.W. Tips Density Comp Tips 15' Tips Braided Loops
    Floating fly lines float because they are constructed from materials that are lighter in weight (less dense) than water. Sinking fly lines sink because they are heavier (more dense) than water.
    Water is 800 times denser than air. Air molecules create less friction than water molecules traveling at the same speed. In any river, most of the current speed is near the surface of the water because air molecules create less friction on water molecules than water molecules do against each other. The deep er the water, the heavier it gets, which creates even more friction. The deeper the water, the slower it moves. The bottom of most rivers is like a giant piece of sandpaper, which creates even more friction. Fly lines sink faster in slower water, so the deeper they go, the faster they sink.
    So, the relative operating depth of a fly line is not only controlled by the velocity of the water and the density of the line but also the length of the sinking portion of the line. The longer the line, the better chance it has to reach the slower water where it can sink faster. Problem is, longer lines will always be harder to cast than shorter ones.
    Click for larger picture...
    Around 1990, in the Pacific Northwest, there occurred an explosion of interest in fishing for steelhead with two hand fly rods. Anglers tried adapting European Atlantic Salmon tackle, but it didn't work very well because our rivers and fish are different. U.S. anglers quickly adopted weight-forward  lines with changeable sinking tips. In the beginning the most popular lines used heads of about 55' with sinking tips that were 15' long.  During this period most two-hand rods were 14' - 15' long. Anglers figured out that these types of rods were too large for all but the largest steelhead rivers. As shorter rods became more popular, lines with shorter heads also became more popular. As the rods got shorter, it became more difficult for novice anglers to cast the standard 15' sinking tips. This is because when the forward cast is executed, the sinking tip has to be aimed at the target. If part of the sinking tip is pointed anywhere else, it will create a tremendous amount of friction when it tries to leave the water, resulting in a poor cast.
    About five years ago, Mike McCune, Scott O'Donnell & Ed Ward working with RIO came up with a system of shorter tips that novice anglers could adapt to more easily. They are called M.O.W. Tips. They are thoroughly explained here: M.O.W. Tips
    To control sink rate and remain easy to cast, M.O.W. Tips use varying proportions of floating and sinking materials in their construction. M.O.W. Tips do a very good job under many conditions, but a 10' long tip or 12.5' long tip will never reach as deep as a 15' tip of the same weight and density. For that reason anglers are experimenting with Skagit Heads constructed with portions that sink to extend the length of sinking tip without increasing the overall length of the line. To blend more seamlessly with the new intermediate sinking heads RIO has introduces the iMOW Series of tips that use a blend of intermediate and fast sinking materials. They offer a new set of tools with which to control the exact depth of your fly...easier.

    Making Your Own Custom Sinking Tips3
    And Sinking Shooting Heads

    To take the best advantage of many freshwater and saltwater fisheries you often need to get your fly deep. This requires a fly line that sinks quickly. RIO makes extremely high density sinking fly lines that comes in a roll, which can be cut to any length that suits your purpose.
    These lines come in five different weights: T-8 that weighs 8-grains per foot, T-11 that weighs 11-grains per foot, T-14 that weighs 14-grains per foot, T-17 that weighs 17-grains per foot, and T-20 that weighs 20-grains per foot. RIO T-lines are supple, easy to work with, and do not kink while fishing. Sink rates were revised for 2012. T-20 sinks more than 10-inches per second, T-17 sinks about 9-10 inches per second. T-14 sinks about 8-9 inches per second. T-11 sinks about 7-8 inches per second. T-8 sinks about 6-7 inches per second.
    M.O.W. Tips and factory made 10' and 15' density compensated Replacement sinking tips and sinking shooting heads can be purchased in many useable weights and densities as well.
    The advantage you have using the RIO T-lines are that they cost about half as much and can be cut to any length to be customized for many presentation where the highest density sink rates are needed.
    T-8 is designed for single-hand rods 6 through 8 weight and lighter #4-#7 two-hand rods.
    T-11 is ideal for single handed rods between #7 and #9 and two-hand rods of #7 to #9.
    T-14 is best for single-hand rods from 10 through 12 weight, and double-hand rod with Spey lines #8 and heavier. T-14 works especially well with the Skagit Spey lines 475-grains and heavier.
    T-17 is ideal for single handed rods between #11 and #13 and two handed rods of #8 to #10.
    T-17 works especially well with the Skagit Spey lines 575-grains and heavier.
    T-20 is ideal for single handed rods between #12 and #16 and two handed rods of #9 to #11.
    T-20 works especially well with the Skagit Spey lines 650-grains and heavier.
    Heavier lines not only sink faster, but also retain the energy to turn over larger flies.

    The Chart Below offers insights into lengths and weights of T-lines:
    Type 9' 10' 11' 12' 13' 14' 15'
    T-8 72-grains 80-grains 88-grains 96-grains 104-grains 112-grains 120-grains
    T-11 99-grains 110-grains 121-grains 72-grains 132-grains 154-grains 165-grains
    T-14 126-grains 140-grains 154-grains 168-grains 182-grains 196-grains 210-grains
    T-17 153-grains 170-grains 187-grains 204-grains 221-grains 238-grains 255-grains
    T-20 180-grains 200-grains 220-grains 240-grains 260-grains 280-grains 300-grains
    Type 16' 18' 20' 22' 24' 26' 30'
    T-8 128-grains 144-grains 160-grains 176-grains 192-grains 208-grains 240-grains
    T-11 176-grains -grains 220-grains 242-grains 264-grains 286-grains 330-grains
    T-14 224-grains 252-grains 280-grains 308-grains 336-grains 364-grains 420-grains
    T-17 272-grains 306-grains 340-grains 374-grains 408-grains 442-grains 510-grains
    T-20 320-grains 360-grains 400-grains 440-grains 480-grains 520-grains 600-grains
    10 Item Size Description Price To Top
    20120T8 T-8. Rio, 15', T-8, may be cut to length, 8 grains per foot, 6" to 7" per second sink rate $11.95 Sale Ended
    20121T11 T-11. Rio, 15', T-11, may be cut to length, 11 grains per foot, 7" to 8" per second sink rate $11.95 Sale Ended
    20122T14 T-14. Rio, 15', T-14, may be cut to length, 14 grains per foot, 8" to 9" per second sink rate $11.95 Sale Ended
    20123T17 T-17. Rio, 15', T-17, may be cut to length, 17 grains per foot, 9" to 10" per second sink rate $11.95 Sale Ended
    20123T20 T-20. Rio, 15', T-20, may be cut to length, 20 grains per foot, 10" to 11" per second sink rate $11.95 Sale Ended
    20120 T-8. Rio, 30', T-8, welded factory loop on each end, may be cut to length, 8 grains per foot, 6" to 7" per second sink rate $39.95 Sale Ended
    20121 T-11. Rio, 30', T-11, welded factory loop on each end, may be cut to length, 11 grains per foot, 7" to 8" per second sink rate $39.95 Sale Ended
    20122
    T-14. Rio, 30', T-14, welded factory loop on each end, may be cut to length, 14 grains per foot, 8" to 9" per second sink rate $39.95 Sale Ended
    20123
    T-17. Rio, 30', T-17, welded factory loop on each end, may be cut to length, 17 grains per foot, 9" to 10" per second sink rate $39.95 Sale Ended
    20449
    T-20. Rio, 30', T-20, no welded factory loops, may be cut to length, 20 grains per foot, 10+" per second sink rate $39.95 Sale Ended
    20443
    Picture
    T-8. Rio, 500', T-8 Spool, may be cut to length, 8 grains per foot, 8" to 9" per second sink rate $299.95 Sale Ended
    20445
    Picture
    T-11. Rio, 500', T-11 Spool, may be cut to length, 11 grains per foot, 7" to 8" per second sink rate $299.95 Sale Ended
    20440
    Picture
    T-14. Rio, 500', T-14 Spool, may be cut to length, 14 grains per foot, 8" to 9" per second sink rate $299.95 Sale Ended
    20447
    Picture
    T-17. Rio, 500', T-17 Spool, may be cut to length, 17 grains per foot, 9" to 10" per second sink rate $299.95 Sale Ended
    20448
    Picture
    T-20. Rio, 500', T-20 Spool, may be cut to length, 20 grains per foot, 10+" per second sink rate $299.95 Sale Ended
    Building Loops In Rio T-Line Tips
    Starting in the mid- 1960's, tournament casters in the Pacific Northwest revolutionized fly fishing by introducing the double-haul cast and shooting head fly lines attached to monofilament shooting lines. Suddenly anglers could cast nearly twice as far by building much higher line speeds and by reducing line-friction in the rod guides. Anglers also found that they could change from floating heads to sinking heads quickly by attaching their shooting heads and lines together with loop to loop connections. During the late 1980's American anglers also found that they could change the configuration of their Spey lines by loop to looping various lengths of floating and sinking lines together. Slip-over loops made from braided monofilament became the most popular items for these connections. Where large diameter floating line connections are involved, these braided loops remain the most popular tools to get the job done smoothly.
    A popular way to form loops in Rio T-line is to simply fold the end of the line over and nail knot monofilament over it several times. I like 12-pound Maxima for all sizes of T-line loops. Three nail knots add a measure of reliability. Coat the knots with Zap-A-Gap for extra insurance.

    RIO Skagit Tips ON SALE!
    Many Skagit Lines don't come with tips, so we decided to make up our own kits in the most popular sizes. RIO makes the most popular sinking tips. These tip sets will fit heads from 350-grains to 750-grains.  Each kit contains (four tips), an intermediate, type-3, type-6 and type-8 tip. Each tip is 15' long. These tips can be used with all Skagit lines made by RIO, Airflo and Scientific Anglers.

    These sets offer a substantial saving over the cost of the pieces purchased separately ($109.75).

    Rio Skagit Tips, in a wallet.
    Item Description Size Price To Top
    SKGT-T9 RIO Skagit Tip Set 9 REG $99.95
    Sale $69.95
    Sale Ended
    SKGT-T10 RIO Skagit Tip Set 10 REG $99.95
    Sale $69.95
    Sale Ended

    Airflo Custom Cut Tips4
    'Like a Brick' probably best describes the sink rate of a Custom Cut Tip. These were developed to meet the demands from steelhead and striper fishermen, but work for any specie where you have to get your fly deep in a hurry. These 20-foot long tips are looped at each end and may be simply looped to the end of your fly line for a 20-foot depth charge. Most anglers find that this is more than they need and make two shorter tips; such as two ten-footers or maybe an 8' and 12', or a 5' and 15' tips. The combinations are up to you, whether seeking a certain depth or a balance with a certain rod, Custom Cut Tips can help tune your fly line to your specific needs.

     

    Specifications:
    CCT20-200 20ft. long/200-grains 10.0-grains per ft. 7.5" sec. sink rate
    CCT20-330 20ft. long/330-grains 16.5-grains per ft. 9.5" sec. sink rate

    Item Description Size Price To Top
    452162 Airflo Custom Cut Tips, CCT20-200 200-grain $30.95 Sale Ended
    452179 Airflo Custom Cut Tips, CCT20-330 330-grain $30.95 Sale Ended

    The Fly Fishing Shop Will Be Closed January 16
    For Inventory


     

    Fish long & prosper,
    Mark, Patty & Crew

    The Fly Fishing Shop HOME. The Fly Fishing Shop, Welches, OR

    1(800) 266-3971

    P.O. Box 368 - 67296 East Hwy 26
    Welches, Oregon 97067, USA
    Voice: (503) 622-4607 or 1(800) 266-3971 FAX: (503) 622-5490
    flyfish@flyfishusa.com

    1981-2012 The Fly Fishing Shop
    We have been in business since April 21, 1981.

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