Help Save Troy Bachmann, Winner of Article Contest, Mark Bachmann's Calendar

The Fly Fishing Shop HOME. Search Catalog Trips & Schools YouTube Big Stick Forum Fishing Reports Bargains
Blog Gifts Order Info Hire A Guide Newsletters Our Waters Events
Troy Bachmann Needs Your Help!

Fly Inovator Troy Bachmann incarcerated at notorious Venustiano Carranza Prison while awaiting bogus trial

On May 19, 2015, Troy Bachmann, a US Army Veteran, was falsely arrested in Mexico and is being held without bail at one of the country’s most violent and corrupt prisons. He is being accused of agricultural fraud, which is a major crime in the state of Nayarit which is the neighboring state of Jalisco, where has had companies for over 20 years. His first two companies, Frontier Flies & FlyH2O, produced flies for fly fishing and were in fly shops all over the US and 25 other countries.

Troy’s brother, Derek, has been in contact with Sen. Ron Wyden’s office, Congressman Rick Larson's Office, the American Consulate, and the US Embassy in Mexico City—and none of them have been able to do

anything but monitor the situation. It was over a week before the US Consulate knew Troy had been detained and only because Troy's brother Derek called the US Embassy to report him missing.
The problem for Bachmann began when Troy hired a new bookkeeper for Fancy Fresh Farms and started noticing discrepancies in the accounting. An independent audit confirmed his suspicions, but he didn’t have time to deal with it before leaving on a business trip. While he was gone, the bookkeeper and several other employees raided the company’s checking accounts, wiped his computer hard drives clean and planted rumors with Bachmann’s growers that he was planning to leave the country without paying them. When Bachmann agreed to meet with some of them to straighten out the misunderstanding, he was surrounded by police and arrested on the spot. No warrant. No explanation. No reading him his rights. He was simply handcuffed and hauled away.

Troy was taken to Venustiano Carranza Prison in Tepic, Nayarit, where he is currently at, it was built to accommodate about 650 inmates; it now has a population of over 3000, of which Troy is the only American. Troy now lives in a 5X10 cell with 5-7 other inmates, has to eat rancid "food" and has to pay for virtually everything, including rent on his tiny portion of the cell, if he has to make a phone call he has to pay to leave his cell, then 10 times the amount that the phone call would cost. "He has to pay to use the toilet, then more if he wants to use toilet paper!" says Derek

"There are no places to eat or sleep. We sleep and eat like animals on the floor. Worse yet, they charge each person a weekly quota . Beds $150, floor $100, food $20, cleaning supplies $20, fan $30-$100, TV $100." Says Troy

How the public can help bring Troy Bachmann home:

Donate funds to help cover Troy’s rising legal bills and living expenses.

PayPal: friendsoftroy@gmail.com
U.S. Bank: Friends of Troy
Fundly: https://fundly.com/friends-of-troy

Call Senator Ron Wyden (202) 224-5244 and ask what they are doing to help him

Email Senator Ron Wyden https://www.wyden.senate.gov/contact/

Winner of the Article Contest: The Steelhead Plan
 
The Steelhead Plan: Entry #13
By Tim Rawlins

Every successful Steelhead fisherman knows he must have a Steelhead plan.  Not a plan for where to fish or when to go there or even how to cast, mend, step, swing a fly, read water or pack your toilet paper in a water tight plastic bag.  I’m talking about having a rock solid plan for what you will do when a fish takes your fly.

I say this as someone who has in the past displayed the knee jerk reaction of wildly setting the hook at the faintest hint of a nibble.  I’m talking shoulder dislocation here.  I came by it honestly.  As a kid fishing for Trout and Chub in the pristine waters of Pudding creek I was often admonished by my mentors to set the hook to keep from loosing fish that had taken my nightcrawler.  I don't think I had a problem though until I learned to bounce my pencil lead and Okie drifter along the bottom of coastal rivers and swing for the bleachers at even the slightest pause in the bouncing.  I didn't catch many steelhead that way but boy did I sure set my fair share of hooks, mostly into rocks and submerged logs.  Later, dry fly fishing for Kamloops Rainbow, the adrenaline rush of seeing a big trout boil for my Tom Thumb made it all but impossible for me not to snap my tippet.  I did manage to land a few trout with really tough lips which Is exactly how the Kamloops Rainbow Trout got its name.  Kam is Latin for tough and loops means lips. Trust me on this.  

So I have had to reprogram myself to let the fish hook itself.  This has not come easy.  Before my reprogramming, a fish would have to be very subtle, cunning  and stretchy to hook himself and stay hooked while I pummeled away at his lips.  That's how the Steelhead originally earned the Latin name O.mykiss.  It started out, Oh my aching Kisser but was later changed for brevity by Lewis and Clark who were fierce lip rippers themselves.

Not that I hadn't landed my fair share or at least slightly less than my fair share of fish.  

There was the time my fishing partner and I were sharing a run on a famous Northwest Steelhead river.  We had each fished through the bucket a couple of times and stopped to visit and swap outfits for a little casting competition before walking back up to the car. When he handed me back my rod there was a Steelhead attached to my fly.  Neither of us realized it until I started stripping my line in.  That was the most unsatisfying fish I have ever landed.  It was a little embarrassing. Had I hooked and landed the fish alone I could have done some modest gloating about my stealth and skill at swinging a fly because I had landed a wild steelhead on a crowded river and my partner had not, thereby making me the superior fisherman and possibly a superior being.  Instead, he rolled his eyes at me. Since neither of us could take credit for the catch we both just shrugged our shoulders and meekly released the fish without so much as snapping a single photo.  Photos would have been most inappropriate for such an event.

When one has a concrete plan which does not include ripping the fly away from the fish and one  implements the plan it is very rewarding to land that fish.  It is for me anyway. Upon feeling a grab, my original style hook set involved a several tiered approach which unfolded in the following order,  1) panic, 2) Jerk violently,  3) (AAHHGGGG!  4) slump,  5) relocate shoulder.

My new plan involves the following: 1) remain calm, 2) do nothing, 3) steady the rod as the fish is allowed to swim away with the fly, 4) nonchalantly set the hook, 5) panic (after the fish is landed)  Some fishermen leave a loop of slack running line hanging off the reel that they let slip through their fingers in the event the fish takes their fly. I do that sometimes but it's very important to double check that your running line has not half hitched itself around the butt of your rod or reel or partner or anywhere else where it could tie off hard and fast resulting in a do-over of steps 3 through 5 of my original style.

I am not recommending my plan, just my philosophy which is to stay calm and do as little as possible until the fish hooks himself.   This philosophy led me to my most triumphant and glorious Steelhead landing experience which happened just recently.

I had been fishing a run on another fabled river in Oregon. I stuck fish on several consecutive Friday afternoons on my way home from work but was unable to bring one to hand.  So I had a very good idea of the general vicinity of the best lie in the run.  

On this particular Friday afternoon as I swung my fly through the lie I felt a faint peck.  I remained calm.  My standard practice of shortening up and swinging a smaller fly through the run produced nothing but I did manage a funky knot in my aging mono running line.   I decided to loose this mess of running line which I did by way of chopping it off and, ever the conservationist, stuffing it down into my waders.  

I’m now perched precariously on a submerged ledge that I have somehow waded to, seventy feet out in the river, almost directly above the lie.   A young couple on a romantic evening stroll walks out on a nearby hand bridge.  About 50 yards away as the crow flies, and high above, they are perched in perfect observation of what they will soon come to believe is an expert spey fishermen.  Little do they know, it is only me, stuffing something down my waders.   They watch for five minutes while I fix my running line and bag the comeback fly idea. The water is warming, lowish, and clear but my confidence is murky.  It's Moal leech time.  My big, purple, red dumbbell eyed Moal leech with gobs of tinsel.  The single best producer in my box, or in this case, outside the box.  I take a deep breath and compose myself with the thought that my toilet paper is dry.  With fresh mono running line I launch a cast so far that, indeed, the last time I launched anything remotely close to that distance it was the tip section of my partners Deathstar into the Deschutes River when I tried to impress some young rafters during the waning days of the bikini hatch.  Nothing.  Two more identical casts, only further.  After a big tight line mend, the Mother of all Leech’s swings through the lie so slowly I could not have replicated the action had I swung it from a sideplaner off a 20’ bamboo pole.  In slow motion the fish hits.  KEEERWUUMP.   I implement my plan by standing there calmly as it peels off a very respectable amount of line. I lift my rod, stop my reel as the fish hits the end and flies plumb out of the water.  I stifle a yawn.  This thing has a tail like a floor broom.  It makes a few mad runs.  Comes out of the water again.  Sounds like a draft horse out there plowing through a swamp.  My caged clicker screams. The mono running line burns my fingers a little bit as I slow the reel down by fingering the spool. I manage to fight this creature while stumbling my way back to shore so I could land it standing flat footed on the beach.  I don't know how long the fight lasted but it must have been a quite a while because when I tailed the beauty she seemed to have shrunk somewhat from her original behemoth size.  But for once, everything  was perfect.  The couple on the footbridge witnessed almost the entire episode.  They left right before I subdued the beast, presumably to fetch their fishing gear.  I guess they missed the part at the end where I expertly brought the fish to hand. Then I panicked. Right after I took the photos.  

 
Mark Bachmann's Daily Calendar for year 2015
      Last Up-Dated: 07/25/2015
Deschutes Plan  Prices Sandy & Clackamas Plan  Prices
January   Details April   Details July   Details October   Details
February   Details May   Details August   Details November   Details
March   Details June   Details September   Details December   Details
2015 Deschutes Operating Plan Based On Power Boat
Single 10-Day Base Camps - Rotating 2-3-4 or 5 Night Parties.
With a jet boat, I can give you better service by providing more luxurious camps with bigger tents and a propane heated shower, better cooking & eating facilities etc.

Big Boat for 2015 Alumaweld Intruder 22' 330hp V-8, all-weather, completely covered convertible cabin, complete with heaters for cold weathers and much open ventilation for hot weather. Boat has full electronics for gathering information and a power wash-down system for spotlessness.  This boat fits the size of the river and is very safe.  

2-4 Angler Groups
This is the size of groups I have worked with for the last 32 years.
A 2-4 angler group fits the size of the river and will allow lots of personal attention from me to you.

2-5 Night Camps
This length of stay is easy to keep food fresh in camp.  Logistically this length of stay works for us.  Don't worry, I can work it out if you want to stay longer (even much longer).  Camping on the river is much more relaxing than staying in a motel and then racing to your fishing spot every morning and then racing back the motel every evening.  That's called the access rod blues.  My plan will eliminate your having to drive in the dark...either direction.  The best fishing is usually during morning and evening parts of the day.  So do your traveling in the middle of the day when the fishing is slow.  You'll be there in plenty of time to catch the evening rise.  And you will be rested and relaxed enough to fully enjoy it when it happens.

Groups Arrive And Exit Camp At Mid-Day
Having a camp set up for multiple parties will eliminate the need for you to race to the river early so that we can get a good camp site. You arrive in camp in the middle of the day and will have plenty of time to get organized before the evening fishing begins.  There will be plenty of snacks for you fuel up on.  Dinner will be planned around the fishing.  Fish 'til dark and stay up as late as you like.  Get up early the next morning.  Coffee and pastries will be waiting.  Get in a good session of fly fishing before the sun hits the water.  Have brunch in the late morning.  Go fishing, laze around, ask me to give a class in camp, what ever.  Eat, sleep, relax and fish and fish and fish...
Back To Deschutes Trips Home Page

2015 Sandy & Clackamas Operating Plan
 Float Trips On Sandy & Clackamas Rivers
Because of inclement weather and unpredictable water flows, no camp-out trips are offered from January 1 through April 19.  The last month float trips are available is June.  In order maintain other business commitments, float trips will only be available on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. The length of each fishing day is defined by the opening/closing of launch facilities & your needs.
Hot lunches are provided. 
An incredibly diver array of the latest fly fishing tackle will be available for you to use
at no extra charge.
You may book by the day or by the week.
How to use the Calendar for year 2015
Jet Boat Free Days On Deschutes Are Designated In Gray.
Days Available For Day Trips Only Designated In Green.
Days Available For Deschutes Camping Trips Designated In Yellow.
Dates That Are Booked Are In Blue.
Special Events are  In Orange.
Schools Are In Red.
BOOK NOW: mark@flyfishusa.com
January February March
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
             
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31        
4:F13:3Q20:N26:1Q
3:F11:3Q18:N25:1Q
5:F13:3Q20:N27:1Q

January -  Day Trips Only
Coldest month of the year, with most unpredictable weather patterns. In spite of that many very large steelhead are caught from local rivers in January.  Some Januarys are mellow, others are not.  All trips are contingent upon weather and water.  Normal temperatures are above freezing to mid-40's.  Water temperature averages below 40.  Fishing pressure is normally low.

February -  Day Trips Only
The weather starts to mellow in February with many days in high 40's to low 50's.  Water temperature average 39-46.  The bulk of the wild winter run shows up in February as does the majority of indigenous brood stock hatchery fish.  Book early for February.

March -  Day Trips Only
March can still be blustery, but the weather is warming.  Mid-day temperatures are usually in the 50's and the water is normally 40-47.  March fish ar biters and there are nearly as many in March as February.  Normally the first summer run fish are caught in March.

How to use the Calendar for year 2015
Jet Boat Free Days On Deschutes Are Designated In Gray.
Days Available For Day Trips Only Designated In Green.
Days Available For Deschutes Camping Trips Designated In Yellow.
Dates That Are Booked Are In Blue.
Special Events are  In Orange.
Schools Are In Red.
BOOK NOW: mark@flyfishusa.com
April May June
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    
             
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31            
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30        
             
4:F11:3Q18:N25:1Q
3:F11:3Q18:N25:1Q
2:F9:3Q16:N24:1Q

April - Day trips are available.
The Sandy and Clackamas are receiving increasing numbers of summer steelhead as winter steelhead are decreasing.  A few Spring Chinook are available some years. 

May - Camp Trips &  Day trips are also available.
. On the Deschutes mayfly and stonefly hatches dominate and there is often a lot of good fishing in the middle of the day.  Normal peak of Spring Chinook run (last week in April - first two weeks in May)  There are still very few other people in the canyon.  The trout have finished their reproductive cycle and are returning to feeding in earnest.  May can be magical month with green grass and beautiful wild flowers. Can do trips on the Deschutes or west side as demand dictates. 
Sandy River Spey Clave will dominate my schedule from 5/16 through 5/18.
The Sandy and Clackamas are receiving increasing numbers of summer steelhead and Spring Chinooks.  Weather is mild.  The canyons are intense green.

June 
On the Deschutes mayfly and stonefly hatches dominate and there is often a lot of good fishing in the middle of the day.  There are still very few other people in the canyon.  June can be magical month for trout fishing on the Deschutes with green grass and beautiful wild flowers and lots of hungry trout.
The Sandy and Clackamas are receiving increasing numbers of summer steelhead and Spring Chinooks.  Weather is mild.  June is the most beautiful month on the west side of the Cascades.
Tenkarafest June 13
Will be hosting a trip to Loreto, Mexico June 25 thru July 2; possibly best dorado fishing in the world.

How to use the Calendar for year 2015
Jet Boat Free Days On Deschutes Are Designated In Gray.
Days Available For Day Trips Only Designated In Green.
Days Available For Deschutes Camping Trips Designated In Yellow.
Dates That Are Booked Are In Blue.
Special Events are  In Orange.
Schools Are In Red.
BOOK NOW: mark@flyfishusa.com
July August September
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31  
             
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      
             
1:F8:3Q15:N24:1Q31:F
6:3Q14:N22:1Q29:F
5:3Q13:N21:1Q27:F

July
Prime trout time. Caddis Mania,  MD's, Midges and Aquatic Moths a lot of action all day.  Best action will be a O-dark-thirty.  The days get hotter, but the water is still cool.  Trout are active all day in the shady spots.  The latter camp, the first steelhead start to show and they are fresh and smokin' hot. Human traffic in the canyon increases, but there is still a lot of room and our privacy is not effected.

August
Very bright "grabby" steelhead are normally available this period in good numbers. Hot weather and warming water temperatures confines fishing to morning and evening periods except for rare cloud cover days.  August is often one of the very best month of the entire season for Deschutes steelhead.  Plan on being in the shade during the middle of the day. 

September
September is a top month for steelhead.  Fish are at maximum numbers.  Hot weather and warming water temperatures confines fishing to morning and evening periods except for rare cloud cover days. The weather and water usually starts to cool around September 20 and fall fishing begins.  The trout begin to wake up with fall caddis hatches, but are usually over-shadowed by great steelhead fishing. Dates for Summer Steelhead PhD Schools 09/10-09/16.

 
How to use the Calendar for year 2015
Jet Boat Free Days On Deschutes Are Designated In Gray.
Days Available For Day Trips Only Designated In Green.
Days Available For Deschutes Camping Trips Designated In Yellow.
Dates That Are Booked Are In Blue.
Special Events are  In Orange.
Schools Are In Red.
BOOK NOW: mark@flyfishusa.com
October November December
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30          
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    
4:3Q12:N20:1Q27:F
3:3Q11:N19:1Q25:F
3:3Q11:N18:1Q25:F

October
Steelhead still available in good numbers.  Weather and water are cooling.  Fall hatches of caddis, midges and mayflies are making the trout more active.  Good chance to fish trout during the day and steelhead early and late.  Steelhead are often hooked while trout fishing. Some of the largest steelhead are caught this time of year.

November  -  Day Trips Only
It starts getting really cold on the east side of the Cascades in early November.  For that reason I prefer not to camp out beyond the first week in November.  Fishing can be as good on the west side of the Cascades and is much warmer.

December -  Day Trips Only
Metal Head Christmas: December 13.
Early December can be pretty nice weather most years.  Late December can be cold.  Some years there are good numbers of winter steelhead. In the Sandy and Clackamas Rivers.


The Fly Fishing Shop HOME. The Fly Fishing Shop, Welches, OR

1(800) 266-3971

P.O. Box 368 - 67296 East Hwy 26
Welches, Oregon 97067, USA
Voice: (503) 622-4607 or 1(800) 266-3971 FAX: (503) 622-5490
flyfish@flyfishusa.com

1981-2015 The Fly Fishing Shop
We have been in business since April 21, 1981.

To Top