Net Spinning Caddis, Caddis Flies, TFO Clouser Rods

The Fly Fishing Shop HOME. * Search Catalog Trips & Schools Bargains SALE ENDED
Our Waters Order Info Steelheadquarters Events

FISH LONG & PROSPER !!!

Topics  GOD BLESS AMERICA !!!

Net Spinning Caddis
Caddis Flies
TFO Clouser Rods


SALE ENDED




Net Spinning Caddis
By: Rick Hafele
Dave Hughes
This trout came up for a caddis dry fly for Dave Hughes...
According to the calendar summer has started.  That means some important changes are happening with bug hatches on streams and lakes.  Mid-day hatches, while still possible especially on cool and cloudy days, will be declining and the major periods of bug activity will be in the morning and evening.  The type of insects on the water is also changing.  The dominant hatches of spring, such as blue-winged olives, green rock worms, salmonflies, and golden stones have passed, and have been replaced with hatches like pale morning duns, pale evening duns and especially caddis!
Net-spinning caddis adults are also called spotted sedges. 
Net-spinning caddis adults are also called spotted sedges.  This adult, about a size 14, is typical of many species.
The one caddis that stands out this time of year is also one of my favorites: the net-spinning caddis of the family Hydropsychidae.  Like many caddis hatches it is difficult to pin this hatch to one species.  The family Hydropsychidae is made up of several important genera and over 145 species.  The important thing for western anglers to know, however, is that beginning about mid June and continuing throughout the summer into early September, the dominant caddis hatch on streams consists of several species of this important family.
Fishing pupa patterns with a Leisenring lift or wet-fly swing in riffles is a great way to catch trout.
Fishing pupa patterns with a Leisenring lift or wet-fly swing in riffles is a great way to catch trout.
Net-spinning caddis larvae love moderate to fast riffles and runs with a cobble to boulder bottom.  Just the kind of water most western trout streams have plenty of.  The larvae feed in a unique way by spinning spider-like webs of silk.  Silk production is common to all caddis; it’s what holds the cases together of caddis that build their homes out of sticks or stones.  But the net-spinning caddis larvae don’t build a tubular case to live in.  Instead they construct a rough shelter on the side of a rock, and then build a net of silk positioned so the current flows through it.  The net then collects small bits of food drifting in the current.  Pretty cool!  As the attached picture shows, the population of larvae and their nets can reach impressive numbers.  What makes them important to the angler is that these larvae routinely drift in large numbers as they look for less crowded neighborhoods to live in.
Net-spinning caddis larval nets billow in the current collecting food. 
Net-spinning caddis larval nets billow in the current collecting food.  In the right habitat their numbers can reach huge numbers.
One of my favorite searching nymphs is a pattern that matches these net-spinning caddis larvae.  Some larvae will be dark brown, others olive, and others bright green.  I use a green rock worm nymph for the green larvae and vary the color when needed.  A size 14 or 16 matches most species, however there is one giant net-spinning caddis called Arctopsyche grandis, a.k.a. the giant McKenzie caddis for those who live on the McKenzie River in Oregon.  The larva of this species requires a size 10 or even 8 nymph pattern to match them.   Fish nymph patterns in the early to mid morning in and around riffles.  Make sure you get your flies right down off the bottom with a dead drift.
Net-spinning caddis larvae come in different sizes and colors. 
Net-spinning caddis larvae come in different sizes and colors.  The larva on the left is Arctopsyche grandis, the largest species and about an inch long.  The little larva on the right is a more typical size.
More exciting than fishing nymphs along the bottom, are the crazy hatches the net-spinning caddis produce this time of year.  Hatches begin with the pupae swimming up to the surface where the adults emerge.  Pupae develop in the same riffles and runs the larvae live in, hidden in a shelter of small gravel and sticks made by the larva just before pupation.  The time of day pupa actually leave their protective shelters for their last swim to the surface varies between mid-morning and mid afternoon.  This means you should pay close attention to what’s happening on the water.  Even if you don’t see caddis adults emerging it can be worth fishing a pupa pattern most anytime between say 10 AM and 4 or 5 PM.  There are some great pupa patterns now available.  These include LaFontaine’s sparkle pupa plus some new designs.  I also find traditional soft hackles quite effective and fun to fish.  Colors of the pupae will vary with species and may be tan, olive, or even bright green, with tan the most common.  Size 14’s or 16’s will match most species except for the giant Arctopsyche – it needs a size 10 pupa.
Net-spinning caddis pupae vary in color from tan, to olive, to bright green, and in size from 10’s to 16’s.
Net-spinning caddis pupae vary in color from tan, to olive, to bright green, and in size from 10’s to 16’s.  This is the large pupa of Arctopsyche grandis.
A Leisenring lift is a great way to fish pupa patterns.  Cast up and across the current.  Let your fly sink, then about mid-way through the drift stop your rod and give it a slight lift.  This draws your fly up towards the surface like an emerging pupa.  For this method to work best, your fly needs to sink a couple feet deep, so adding a small split shot to your leader about 15 inches above the fly may be necessary.  A standard wet-fly swing can also work well.  Pupae live and emerge in the riffles and runs, so don’t hesitate to fish pupa patterns right through the pocket water in a choppy riffle.  During the summer this type of water can be a favorite hangout for trout.
Swarming adult caddis in the evening light is a common sight throughout the summer. 
Swarming adult caddis in the evening light is a common sight throughout the summer.  Time to tie on a diving adult pattern and get ready for some fast fishing.
If you’re hoping for good surface activity, you will find it in the mid to late evening when the sun gets off the water.  That’s when the females, which have already mated on streamside foliage, return to the water to lay their eggs.  It’s hard to miss them as they typically swarm in large groups above the tops of streamside trees or shrubs before heading to the water.  On a good night you’ll see hundreds of adult darting around the water’s surface and trout slapping and splashing like little kids at a water park
Like other caddis, net-spinning caddis adults mate on streamside foliage. 
The way caddis do it!  Like other caddis, net-spinning caddis adults mate on streamside foliage.  The females then return to the water where they lay their eggs by diving below the surface and swimming to the bottom.
You’ll be tempted to fish a dry fly, and I recommend you give them a try.  However, if you find fish slapping the water all around your fly but not on it, there’s a good reason.  The female caddis actually dives underwater and swims to the bottom and lays her eggs on the rocks.  Once the eggs are laid she drifts back up to the surface.  This means many, if not most, trout are taking adults below the surface, and in their excitement they break the surface with their tails or backs.  A diving adult pattern is the solution.  This can be a pattern tied specifically as a diving adult or a standard dry fly fished wet by placing a split shot on the leader about 15 inches away.  A wet-fly swing is a good approach, but be sure you don’t strike hard when you feel a tug or you’ll break off most of the fish you hook.  Instead let go of the line when you feel a strike, and let the fish make their first run.  You’ll be able to enjoy these crazy caddis hatches all summer long!
Net-spinning caddis get trout excited all summer.
Net-spinning caddis get trout excited all summer.  Be ready or be…..  You get the idea!

See Rick Hafele with our good friend John Smeraglio from LaghingRivers.com.
They are previewing their newest DVD:
"Advanced Tactics for Emergers and Dries."
Caddis Flies
To match the West's best summer hatches from Oregon to Colorado.
Bead Head Caddis Pupa Edible Emerger
Primetime Pupa X-Caddis
Sub-merger Diving Caddis
Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa
Beadhead Pupa, Black Beadhead Pupa, Olive Beadhead Pupa, Tan

Brian Silvey is a popular local fly fishing guide. Here is what Brian says about these caddis pupas:
Anglers fishing in the Rockies may not be as in tune with caddis because they have more options of food sources that trout focus on.  That gives these anglers the luxury of fishing attractor patterns, terrestrial patterns, mayfly patterns and stone fly patterns.  On the Deschutes the primary food source day in and day out for reside trout are caddis.  As a guide on this river it means I must have effective patterns that can imitate every stage of the caddis life cycle that fish will focus on to insure my clients are successful.

My Edible Emerger and Primetime Pupa are designed to target emerging caddis close to the surface or right in the surface film.  The above mentioned patterns can be fished deep for effective results but were not specifically designed to do so. 

I wanted to have a caddis emerger pattern specifically designed to be fished deeper and to get deep fast.  The result of this need is the Silvey’s Beadhead Pupa.  For weight I used a bead.  I chose pearl core braid as a quick sinking material for the body.  The pearl core braid is the same size as the bead and allows me to create a seamless taper from bead to end of body closely mimicking the tapered look of the natural.  The result is a pattern that has weight to get it down quick, materials that don’t float (and are not bulky) aiding in sinking the fly. These materials do not lose their caddis shape.  And like my other pupas the use of marabou created natural movement as the pattern is fished.

Note:  Natural caddis are very quick swimmers.  Do not be afraid to increase the speed of any of your presentations.  In particular as the line tightens up and the presentation is imitating the natural swimming towards shore.  One method to increase the speed of the fly is to put a down-stream mend in your line as the flies get below you.  Another method is to use the rod tip to lead the fly to shore almost dragging / leading them into shore.  To control the speed use the rod tip as an accelerator.  The faster the rod tip is moved to shore the faster the flies will move through the water and vice versa.

Silvey's Beadhead Pupa, Black
The Beadhead Pupa can be fished in the following ways. Try fishing your
Beadhead Pupa as a dropper off of a dry caddis such as a Twilight Elk Hair Caddis.  Make sure you let the fly swing tight against your line so the pupa riding below the point fly comes tight and begins to rise.  Trout key on this pattern as it starts to rise and you will most likely find the majority of the eats come during this part of the drift.

Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa, Black

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0232 Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa, Black 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

Silvey's Beadhead Pupa, Olive
When fishing any color of Bead Head Pupa, use a 2 nymph system keeping the pupa higher in the water column.  My preferred method is to tie the pupa to the tag end of a blood knot with a larger heavier fly like a cased caddis or stone fly nymph, which is tied to the end of a 9-foot 4X.  Be sure to let the line tighten up at the end of the drift and let the fly swing to shore.  Trout key on this rise and swing similar to the natural caddis swimming aggressively towards shore.

Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa, Olive

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0234 Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa, Olive 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

Silvey's Beadhead Pupa, Tan
Try fishing any color of Bead Head Pupa on the swing.  Carry a shock loop to absorb the shock of a strike. In this case you can run a 2 fly rig with the bead pupa at the bottom and any of the following flies; Submerger Caddis, Diving Caddis, Edible Emerger & Primetime Pupa placed as point flies.  Cast the fly directly toward the center of the stream to give the patterns some time to sink.   Mend the line and then let it tighten up and swing towards shore.  Hang on, strikes fishing this method can be heart stopping.

Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa, Tan

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0236 Silvey's Beadhead Caddis Pupa, Tan 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

Silvey's Primetime Pupa
Primetime Pupa, Tan Primetime Pupa, Olive
 

Silvey’s Primetime Pupa

This fly is an extension of the Silvey's Edible Emerger only designed to be fished deeper.  There is no deer hair on the fly to keep it on or in the surface film. 

For the Edible Emerger I created a body that was slim and tapered at the end similar to the naturals.   I added marabou to add movement to the pattern, a material none of the existing patterns use.  Fish key on movement and marabou is one of the materials that have the most life like qualities when wet.

The Primetime Pupa can be fished in a number of ways.

Dropper – Drop this fly off of an easily visible caddis dry when fishing during caddis hatches.  Don’t forget to let the fly swing into shore at the end of your dry fly drift.

Nymphing Plus - Primetime Pupa can be nymphed but make sure it is the upper nymph on a 2 fly rig so it floats higher in the water column.  If you see a fish rise while fishing this way cut off your 2nd nymph and take any weight off the rig.  Cast it at the rise without having to completely re-rig.

Brian Silvey

Silvey's Primetime Pupa, Tan

Be sure to catch a newly hatched adult and examine the body color. Fish can be very selective on color.

 

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0116 Silvey's Primetime Pupa, Tan 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
Silvey's Primetime Pupa, Olive

Try fishing your Primetime Pupa with a wet fly swing similar to fishing a steelhead fly. Use a shock loop and let the fish take a little line so they can turn back towards the bottom before setting the hook.

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0118 Silvey's Primetime Pupa, Olive 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

Silvey's Edible Emerger
Edible Emerger, Olive Edible Emerger, Tan
I guide the Deschutes River, in Oregon, which is a predominately caddis river.  The caddis pupa is an important fly pattern to insuring my client’s success.  The existing caddis pupae patterns on the market were too bulky, round and had no movement for my tastes.

The Edible Emerger was created with a body that is slim and tapered at the end similar to the naturals.   I added marabou to add movement to the pattern, a material none of the existing patterns use.  Fish key on movement and marabou is one of the materials that have the most life like qualities when wet.
The deer hair head is there to keep the pattern fishing on the surface or just under the surface.  It has the added effect of creating a bubble trail when swung on a tight line.

The Edible Emerger can be fished in a number of ways.

Dropper – Drop this fly off of an easily visible caddis dry when fishing during caddis hatches.  Don’t forget to let the fly swing into shore at the end of your dry fly drift.

Dry – Grease the head / deer hair only.  You want the body of the fly to be fishing in the film or just under the surface. Wet the body with your fingers.  Fish the fly upstream as you would any other dry but let it swing to the bank on a tight line on the end of your drift.

Nymphing Plus -  The Edible Emerger can be nymphed but make sure it is the upper nymph on a 2 fly rig so it floats higher in the water column.  If you see a fish rise while fishing this way cut off your 2nd nymph and take any weight off the rig.  Cast it at the rise without having to completely re-rig.

Brian Silvey
Edible Emerger – Designer
Silvey's Edible Emerger, Olive

These little half-submerged flies are very difficult to see on/in the water. Using a dry fly as a strike indicator is a real help. An easy to see fly like a Royal Wulff with a 2'-3' leader tied off the bend of the hook can really help you keep track of your emerger.

Silvey's Edible Emerger, Olive

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG1167 Silvey's Edible Emerger, Olive 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
Silvey's Edible Emerger, Tan

Many of our rivers really come alive during the last hour of light. Even white wing flies can be hard to see in the glare. Try a black fly as a strike indicator.

Silvey's Edible Emerger, Tan

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG1168 Silvey's Edible Emerger, Tan 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

X-Caddis, trailing shuck caddis cripple
When caddis hatch, most species leave the stream bed and rise to the surface of the water where they shed the pupal skin and become winged adults.  The pupal skin is called a shuck.  Some unfortunate individuals are not able to leave the shuck completely.  They are trapped at the surface of the water with the partially discarded shuck trailing from the rear of their abdomen. Caddis are unable to lift the heavy waterlogged shuck from the water.  Trout know that these individual flies are crippled.  Some trout will target these cripples nearly exclusively.  Most trout will rise quicker to a caddis that is crippled than one that is not.  Species of caddis that create dense hatches are more prone to produces higher numbers of trailing shuck cripples.

X-Caddis, Olive
Hatches of Rhyacophila and Brachycentrus caddis can produce enough green or olive body trailing shuck cripples to make some trout selective to them.  These hatches occur from May through October.
Item Description Size Price To Top
99206-14 X-Caddis, Olive 14 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
99206-16 X-Caddis, Olive 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
99206-18 X-Caddis, Olive 18 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
X-Caddis, Tan
Hatches of Hydropsyche caddis can come off in blizzard hatches from May through October.  Some of these hatches produce an abnormally high percentages of trailing shuck cripples.  These are the caddis that produce the blizzard hatches of early fall.
Item Description Size Price To Top
99207-14 X-Caddis, Tan 14 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
99207-16 X-Caddis, Tan 16 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
99207-18 X-Caddis, Tan 18 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

The key to success is "understanding".  You can never know enough.
Understanding the organisms that trout feed on is one of the keys to catching trout.
Caddisflies by Gary LaFontaine 
is great reference material for the trout fisher.
Check out our special deal.

Silvey's Sub-merger Caddis
Sub-merger Caddis, Tan Sub-merger Caddis, Olive
 

Silvey’s Sub-merger Caddis

The development of the Sub-merger Caddis came out of observing my clients while I was guiding.  There were swarms of Caddis every where but not many fish working the surface.  My clients where fishing Elk Hair Caddis in riffles and having fish come up and refuse the fly.  The few fish we hooked all came at the end of the drift when the fly sank.

That night I went home and designed a Diving Caddis pattern to take advantage of my days observations.  I needed weight to get the fly down so I added a bead in front of the dubbed body.  The fly required movement to replicate the swimming action that the natural diving caddis would have so I included Hungarian Partridge in the wing along with a sparse amount of elk hair.  There is also a little bit of flash in the wing to give the illusion of movement or air bubbles trailing off the pupae.

Diving Caddis patterns are some of the most effective fly patterns on the market but hardly fished by the general public.  I believe this is because most people don’t know how or when to use them. Fish them before, during and after caddis hatches.  They fish well as a dropper during times when no hatches are going on.

The Sub-merger Caddis can be fished in a number of ways.

Dropper – The most common way to fish this fly.  Drop it off any dry fly.

Tight Line Swing – Cast the fly as if you were casting across the river into the current.  Mend the line and let the fly swing all the way to shore or into the shallows.  The takes on this method of fishing are heart stopping.

Nymphed – If fishing a two nymph rig make sure the Sub-merger is floating higher in the water column.

Dry Fly Presentation – Cast the fly upstream as you would any dry fly.  Once the fly hits the water, slowly strip the fly back to you giving the fly an up and down diving motion.  It is deadly after refusals.  If I get a fish that comes up and refuses a caddis dry I put the Diving Caddis on and its “fish on” nine times out of ten.

Brian Silvey
Silvey’s Sub-merger Caddis - Designer
 

Silvey's Sub-merger Caddis, Tan
Essentially this is a sinking Elk Hair Caddis using a brass bead in the body to make it less buoyant than its counterpart and ride under the surface.  Fish this pattern in slower water. When standing and fishing the pattern out of a boat (as a dropper) if you see a fish move, but refusal your dry fly that same fish will often take your submerged fly. Raising your rod to remove the slack will often be rewarded by a hard pull.

 

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0119 Silvey's Sub-merger Caddis, Tan 14 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED
Silvey's Sub-merger Caddis, Olive
If a rise is spotted while fishing this pattern, cast it just above the rise and let it swing or dead drift to the spot of the rise.  Since this pattern will not be far under the surface anglers will see a boil or flash as their indication to set the hook.
This is a great pattern to fish behind a dry caddis that angler is skittering across the surface.  The action of skittering the dry will move this pattern quickly which will induce strikes on fish keyed on the swimming pupas.

 

Item Description Size Price To Top
SIG0120 Silvey's Sub-merger Caddis, Olive 14 3 for $5.85 SALE ENDED

Bob Clouser's Rods by Temple Fork Outfitters
By: Dick Sagara

Choosing the right weapon from a rack full of Clouser Rods is easy. Each rod is marked with a series of Roman Numeral type colored bands. A wide red band equals five and a narrow yellow band equals one. The rod pictured here has a wide red band and two narrow yellow bands which, equals seven for a 7-weight rod.
8' 9" - #5 8' 9" - #6 8' 9" - #7 8' 9" - #8 8' 9" - #9 8' 9" - #10
Bob Clouser
Popular east coast fishing guide, Bob Clouser, pictured testing his rod designs on small mouth bass...
The Clouser Rod Series are built with parabolic actions. That means the bottom sections are softer than might be anticipated (as can be seen by the narrow profile where the rod comes out of the handle). This design allows the caster to easily throw a more open line loops, which is often a preferred technique for casting weighted flies with sinking tip lines.  This avoids tailing loops and  the resulting "spaghetti" with the line/leader, or worse yet a ding in the rod from a weighted fly or a wind knot in the leader. The reason for using weighted flies and sinking lines is to get your fly deep where big fish live.

TFO Rod Rep, Dick Sagara says:

"The positive responses to Bob’s rods became apparent as soon as I handed the rod off to people to cast late last year right after the rods were released.  Simply put, just about everyone who cast the rods really liked them. I’m a skeptic of the “newest and greatest” proclamations that are constantly bantered about and I’ll admit even I was surprised by the extremely positive response to the Clouser rods.
Enough hype from me.  I wanted to see what a couple of individuals who fish a great deal thought about the rod’s casting and fishing properties.  I asked for field testing from Doug Rose, a full time guide & well respected author from Forks, Washington (you know the place where the Vampires from the Twilight movies hang out, along with giant steelhead), and Joe Warren, a Columbia Basin biological services technician, writer, and passionate angler.  I chose these two because I knew that both of them are well rounded anglers who fish a great deal for a wide variety of species, i.e. steelhead, salmon, searun cutthroat, rainbow, bass, etc.  I also chose them because I knew both would be very candid in their feedback about the Clouser rods.
Here’s what they had to say about the TFO Clouser rod:

Doug Rose’s comments:

“I fished the 5-weight Clouser for seas-run cutthroat in saltwater.  The beach I fished was in northern Hood Canal and it was during the March chum fry out-migration.  I immediately liked the rod’s action, with its sensitive tip that tapers quickly into a strong, stiffer middle and butt.  It is perfect for sinking lines, in particular the full length intermediate I use about 80 percent of the time for cutts in the salt, and sink tips.  Its muscular design also made it easy to quickly handle energetic fish in strong currents- an important consideration with precious wild fish like coastal cutthroat in saltwater.  Because seas-runs eat a wide variety of marine creatures- -from 6-plus-inch polychaete worms to tiny krill, cutthroat flies range from large, articulated patterns, to Clouser-type streamers to size 16 invertebrate dressings.  This rod handled all these flies easily and was a pleasure to cast.  In particular, I liked it for roll casting, which I frequently do to bring the line back to the surface in saltwater fishing.   My other saltwater rods are longer and I was concerned that I wouldn’t be able to roll cast or mend as easily but that wasn’t the case at all.  In fact, I really didn’t notice the difference except it was easier to land fish than with the longer rods.  More subjectively, I like the way the rod looks, especially the blue color.”

Joe Warren’s Comments:

“Mr. Clouser is the designer/tyer of the famous Clouser Minnow, you know, the ones with the big barbell eyes.  Unless you have perfected your timing in your cast, along with a well balanced fly line and rod, turning over a streamer type fly like the Clouser Minnow could place you in the form of the infamous, “chuck and duck”. 

I recently acquired a 5 weight Clouser fly rod at 8’9” (the lightest of the bunch) for fishing smallmouth bass and trout in the Columbia River and regional lakes.  First off, the Clouser is so well balanced and smooth you don’t even notice its shorter length.  My recent experiences with fishing the rod have been great.  Using fast sinking lines I had no issues of the rod lagging behind to turn over my large streamers, many of which had barbell eyes. And when it comes time to fight and play the fish, the rod is not so over-powering that you can’t feel the fish.  For stillwater presentations using a slow retrieve, the sensitivity is very good for detecting subtle strikes. 

The Clouser is definitely remaining in my arsenal for the heavy work but at the same time I would not hesitate to switch over to a floating line for dry fly fishing either!”

Clouser testing his rods on saltwater fish... 
 
Clouser & Jake Jordan testing rods on little tunny

Dick Sagara 
 
Joe Warren
 
Five-weight Clouser Rod & big trout are a pleasant combinatuion!

Bob Clouser says,
"For years I have been looking for a multi-species fly rod that puts 'the ease' in casting weighted flies and sinking lines.  Temple Fork Outfitters answered this challenge by developing The Clouser Series of Fly Rods.  Anglers that use weighted flies or split shot should find this series ideal, dry fly fishers will also benefit from the rod's ability to deliver tight loops and specialty casts required to present the fly."

"TiCr coating protects the rod from collisions with hooks and weighted flies.  The attractive blue blank is easy on the eyes as are the three burled cork rings included on the grips - which has the added benefit of preventing wear from many hours of use.  Hook keepers have been added and Lefty's color-coded alignment dot system allows for easy line size recognition.  The four-piece design makes transportation easy."


TF 05 89 4 X

Length: 8' 9"    Line: #5     Pieces: 4

This lightweight rod makes casting linking lines and weighted flies easier. Lake fishers will especially like this stick for casting weighted wooly buggers, etc. Small mouth bass fishers on Oregon's John Day and Umpqua Rivers will love this rod.
Rod weight: 4.8 ounces.

Item Series Line Wt. Action Handle Price To Top
TF 05 89 4 X Clouser 5     $224.95 SALE ENDED

TF 06 89 4 X

Length: 8' 9"    Line: #6     Pieces: 4

This may become one of your favorite Alaska trout rods. It also shines as a bass rod for both surface and subsurface work.
Rod weight: 5.2 ounces.

Item Series Line Wt. Action Handle Price To Top
TF 06 89 4 X Clouser 6     $249.95 SALE ENDED

TF 07 89 4 X Length: 8' 9"    Line: #7     Pieces: 4
This rod will be hard to beat for average size bonefish, redfish and sea trout. It is also a good choice for small steelhead, salmon & larger trout & bass.
Rod weight: 5.3 ounces.
Item Series Line Wt. Action Handle Price To Top
TF 07 89 4 X Clouser 7     $249.95 SALE ENDED

TF 08 89 4 X Length: 8' 9"    Line: #8     Pieces: 4
This is a great rod for the flats or in the mangroves. Take this rod to the Amazon or to Alaska for Silvers.
Rod weight: 5.5 ounces.
Item Series Line Wt. Action Handle Price To Top
TF 08 89 4 X Clouser 8     $249.95 SALE ENDED

TF 09 89 4 X Length: 8' 9"    Line: #9     Pieces: 4

Here's your east coast or west coast striper rod. Whether it's Chesapeake Bay or San Francisco Bay, you will be well served with this rod.

Rod weight: 5.6 ounces.

Item Series Line Wt. Action Handle Price To Top
TF 09 89 4 X Clouser 9     $249.95 SALE ENDED

TF 10 89 4 X Length: 8' 9"    Line: #10     Pieces: 4

Need to cast really heavy or wind-resistant flies, like crab-flies for permit? This rod will cast the flies and handle the fish.
Rod weight: 5.8 ounces.

Item Series Line Wt. Action Handle Price To Top
TF 09 89 4 X Clouser 9     $249.95 SALE ENDED

The Fly Fishing Shop HOME. The Fly Fishing Shop, Welches, OR

1(800) 266-3971

To Top

www.flyfishUSA.com

Fish long & prosper,
Mark & Patty