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Hex Hatches in the Pacific Northwest

Hex Hatches in the Pacific Northwest

Trout Love Hex

As with all mayflies, they grow by shedding their exoskeleton or "skin" in a process called molting. Hexagenia nymphs undergo perhaps as many as 20 to 30 molts. When the nymph is ready for its final molt, it leaves the burrow at dusk or soon after and rapidly swims to the lake surface, where its exoskeleton splits lengthwise down its back....

Echo Carbon XL Series Rodsv

Echo Carbon XL Series Rods

Great rods at a great price is Echo's tradition...

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Fox River Fatigue Fighter Socks

Fox River Fatigue Fighter Socks

It isn't a wonder that our customers love these socks, we use them on a daily basis. "I used these as s liner sock under my normal heavy wool socks on a recent Great Lakes winter steelhead trip. With the water temp at 33 degrees it’s challenging to stay warm and they really helped! I think the compression factor improves circulation which is key." ~Eric

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Scientific Anglers Frequency Magnum Glow Line

Scientific Anglers Frequency Magnum Glow Line

Think of this as the best line for fishing the nocturnal Hex hatch. Wouldn't it be handy to have an idea where your fly line was laying on the water, or when you hook that big trout, which way it ran into your backing. ..

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Hexagenia Dry Flies

Hexagenia Dry Flies

Hexagenia are the largest mayflies which occur in the Pacific Northwest. Their nymphs burrow into silt of pure lakes. These hatches occur late June to early August.

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